interlínc: Buzz: News
Questions? 800.725.3300

Trends and Issues

The iPhone Is Hands Down 'The Dominant Device Brand Among Teens'
Teens are buying more iPhones each time Piper Jaffray Senior Analyst Michael Olson runs his periodic survey. 82% of teens surveyed have...
Read more...
The 'Condom Snorting Challenge' Is Every Parent's Worst Nightmare
Viral videos posted on social media show teenagers snorting condoms as part of a so-called "condom snorting challenge."    In...
Read more...
Porn Is Not The Worst Thing On Musical.ly.
My daughter is ten. She wants me to get Musical.ly on my phone so she can make funny lip-sync videos. Everyone has it, she whines, even the kid...
Read more...
What YOU Need to Know About Juuling
One of the biggest topics right now in high school parent newsle
One of the biggest topics right now in high school parent newsletters everywhere is the Juul. It’s a popular e-cigarette system that looks a...
Read more...
What Parents Need To Know About Sexting
Sexting is defined as the sending or receiving of nude or seminude images or sexually explicit text messages and can happen when one person...
Read more...
News Archives

The Danger More Pressing than Sex and Drugs in Your Youth Group

Tuesday October 10th, 2017

 A new study of today’s teenagers contains both encouraging and troubling findings for parents, pastors, and youth group leaders concerned with reaching “Generation Z.”

 
According to the research, teenagers in the early 2010s tried alcohol later and had sex far less often compared with their predecessors: About 54 percent of high-school students in 1991 reported having had sex, while only 41 percent did in the early 2010s. For student pastors who have been fighting the war against partying, pregnancies and STDs, this is encouraging news; however, the results seem to come with a cost.
 
Swapping Risky Behavior for Different Risky Behavior
Generation Z students (those born between the early 1990s and mid-2000s) are less likely to drive, work for pay, go on dates, or socialize without their parents. While at home, students are largely glued to their smartphones. They are highly active on social media sites that create an illusion of community that research shows actually increases isolation.
 
In an essay for The Atlantic, Jean M. Twenge, a professor of psychology at San Diego State University and the author of Generation Me and iGen, warns about the effect smartphone obsession is having on teens: “the twin rise of the smartphone and social media has caused an earthquake of a magnitude we’ve not seen in a very long time, if ever."
 
 
 

Top | Back to Articles

To see the Image status and get the correct email Click here
X
Yes, I am a full-time, part-time, or volunteer youthworker.